How long ago did lord of the rings actually happen?

Like, i know it’s not entirely true and only based on a true story (the basic characters, like aragorn really existed) but i was going to do it in my modern history class for our in class essay. I can’t do it if it’s older than 200 years old but the movie doesn’t look that old? And what country is middle earth?
-a real question asked on Yahoo Answers

DRACULA: SON OF THE DRAGON prints by @nathanfoxy, one of the perks for my Kickstarter withSalgood Sam.  Together they form a diptych depicting the vampiric excesses a young Vlad the Impaler experiences in the Sultan’s court.  

For those of you who don’t know, DRACULA: SON OF THE DRAGON is the the epic comic book story of how the historical Vlad Tepes became the vampire in Bram Stoker’s Dracula.  

Looks like the first chapter of DRACULA will be out in Salgood’s REVOLVER quarterly in the next couple weeks.  Details on that soon.  Big thanks to Nathan - for whom I’m teaching classes with Jim Rugg for SVA’s Visual Narrative MFA program.  Oh, and Salgood is selling some of his art, which you can buy here.

Hiya Mark, I backed Dracula on Kickstarter - in total awe of your work. I wanted to ask as a fan, do you have a favourite classic Captain America moment? From Hitler-clocking to true blue speechifying, what do you think of when you think of the character and why?

uncannycomicsmag

First, thanks so much for backing DRACULA: SON OF THE DRAGON!  It’s a labor of love and I could not be more thrilled with what salgood is doing with it.  I just sent him lettering corrects on the first chapter, which should be appearing in the next issue of Salgood’s REVOLVER anthology very soon.  I’m now doing some research for some extra pages that Salgood suggested we add for the 2nd chapter (which is otherwise already written and laid out).  Some perks have already gone out, and others should soon.  Nathan Fox’s prints just arrived - I’ll have to post pictures soon.

CAPTAIN AMERICA…I suppose my first thought is the old, old cartoons from the 60s that I saw as reruns in the 80s, which were great despite the terrible animation of Kirby’s work.  I still remember the theme song…”When Captain America Throws His Mighty Shield”.  And making a shield out of a paper plate, which was to scale with my childhood self.

(I also remember some contest Marvel had about giving a superhero a new power, and I wrote in suggesting Cap be able to shoot beams from his gloves like Iron Man.)

Later on, I think I went through a period where, like Superman, I felt I couldn’t relate to Cap because he was so perfect.  Brubaker and Epting’s run changed all that for me…it was Captain America but set in the world of modern espionage which, if you’re familiar with my work you know I’m fascinated by.

I also loved a mini that Mark Waid did that came out just after Obama was elected that retold the story of Cap waking up in contemporary America.  Waid has a way of making seemingly perfect characters relatable and that really hit a great note for me.

I’m sure I’m leaving some great Cap moments out.  And like you said, it’s him nailing Hitler in the face.  Maybe one of the greatest single comic images of all time.  

Tim O’Shea at CBR’s Robot 6 asked creators about the books they most enjoyed in 2013 and are most looking forward to in 2014, as well as their upcoming projects.  You can read the full article here, but below are my answers.  I’m a bit long winded, but there’s really a lot of great work out there.
What was your favorite comic of 2013?
This is tough … there was a lot of great work this year. BKV and Fiona Staples Saga may be everyone’s favorite but still stands out.  So does Jai Nitz and Greg Small’s superheroic noir Dream Thief and Kieron Gillen and Canaan Whiate’s Uber, which is one of the most interesting war comics I’ve read in a while and really shows off Kieron’s range. Under the radar, Alejandro Bruzzese‘s minicomics like Proxy, Leave This Bright World and THRSTshowcase a rising star’s incredibly unique voice, and the Kickstarter anthology Bad Karma by Alex Grecian, Jeremy Haun, B. Clay Moore and Seth Peck was chock full of comics goodness.
But if I had to pick one book, it would be Ryan Browne’s God Hates Astronauts. I guess nominally it’s a superhero book, but really that was just an excuse for Ryan to write, draw, color and letter what is literally the funniest comic I’ve ever read.  It started out as a Kickstarter phenomenon and now looks to be one of Image’s “next big things.”
Comic-wise, what are you most excited about for 2014?
I’m intrigued by what Chuck BB, Daniel Krall, Eric Canete and others are creating for Ivan Brandon’s OFFSET COMICS imprint.
And I’m begrudgingly excited to see Paul Azaceta’s work on Outcast with Robert Kirkman. I only say “begrudgingly” because I’ve been lucky to have worked on multiple books with Paul, and I’ll have to wait a while before I get to do so again because this is Paul’s first ongoing.  But Paul is a transcendent talent and I think Outcast is going to take him to the next level in terms of a mainstream audience appreciating his work.
What personal project are you working on for 2014 that you’re especially pumped about?
I’ve got a book coming out from Image that I can’t speak about yet, and my fingers are crossed for Howard Gordon and Ben Queen’s TV adaptation of my BOOM! Studios book Unthinkable for Fox.  I’m looking forward to continuing to teach for The School of Visual Arts MFA in Visual Narrative program for chair Nathan Fox with my colleague, artist Jim Rugg — it’s the first Master’s program of its kind and we’ve got an incredibly talented group of students.
But I’m most excited about Dracula: Son of the Dragon, the Kickstarter backed book I’m doing with Salgood Sam. It’s a prequel to Bram Stoker’s Dracula and it’s been my passion project that will finally see the light of day in 2014.

Tim O’Shea at CBR’s Robot 6 asked creators about the books they most enjoyed in 2013 and are most looking forward to in 2014, as well as their upcoming projects.  You can read the full article here, but below are my answers.  I’m a bit long winded, but there’s really a lot of great work out there.

What was your favorite comic of 2013?

This is tough … there was a lot of great work this year. BKV and Fiona Staples Saga may be everyone’s favorite but still stands out.  So does Jai Nitz and Greg Small’s superheroic noir Dream Thief and Kieron Gillen and Canaan Whiate’s Uber, which is one of the most interesting war comics I’ve read in a while and really shows off Kieron’s range. Under the radar, Alejandro Bruzzese‘s minicomics like ProxyLeave This Bright World and THRSTshowcase a rising star’s incredibly unique voice, and the Kickstarter anthology Bad Karma by Alex Grecian, Jeremy Haun, B. Clay Moore and Seth Peck was chock full of comics goodness.

But if I had to pick one book, it would be Ryan Browne’s God Hates Astronauts. I guess nominally it’s a superhero book, but really that was just an excuse for Ryan to write, draw, color and letter what is literally the funniest comic I’ve ever read.  It started out as a Kickstarter phenomenon and now looks to be one of Image’s “next big things.”

Comic-wise, what are you most excited about for 2014?

I’m intrigued by what Chuck BB, Daniel Krall, Eric Canete and others are creating for Ivan Brandon’s OFFSET COMICS imprint.

And I’m begrudgingly excited to see Paul Azaceta’s work on Outcast with Robert Kirkman. I only say “begrudgingly” because I’ve been lucky to have worked on multiple books with Paul, and I’ll have to wait a while before I get to do so again because this is Paul’s first ongoing.  But Paul is a transcendent talent and I think Outcast is going to take him to the next level in terms of a mainstream audience appreciating his work.

What personal project are you working on for 2014 that you’re especially pumped about?

I’ve got a book coming out from Image that I can’t speak about yet, and my fingers are crossed for Howard Gordon and Ben Queen’s TV adaptation of my BOOM! Studios book Unthinkable for Fox.  I’m looking forward to continuing to teach for The School of Visual Arts MFA in Visual Narrative program for chair Nathan Fox with my colleague, artist Jim Rugg — it’s the first Master’s program of its kind and we’ve got an incredibly talented group of students.

But I’m most excited about Dracula: Son of the Dragon, the Kickstarter backed book I’m doing with Salgood Sam. It’s a prequel to Bram Stoker’s Dracula and it’s been my passion project that will finally see the light of day in 2014.